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Dodgers: Edwin Rios Has Started Swinging A Bat After Season Ending Surgery

In a 162 game season, it’s easy to forget about the guys who got injured early on. We were reminded of Dustin May after he was seen throwing a ball after his Tommy John surgery that cost him his 2021 season. Now it’s time to remember Edwin Rios.

Rios was lost to a partially torn labrum in his right shoulder, ending his season back in May. This was a tough one for Dodger fans and for Rios. The slugger was struggling mightily before the surgery. His 2021 campaign ended with him going just 4 for 51, posting a .354 OPS. This was tough on Rios because when he was struggling, the fans were really getting on him. He was whiffing at a legendary rate.

However, when it came out he had been playing through a pretty serious injury, it sure explained a lot. Fans can be tough when a player is struggling, but to find out that his beautiful swing was hampered by a serious shoulder injury was heartbreaking for Rios.

The Beautiful Swing Returns

Dustin May appears to be rehabbing with Rios, as he posted this video to his Instagram of Rios back in the cage, swinging the bat.

What Can A Healthy Rios Bring Again?

Rios had great success in limited 2020 play. This is a quote from a Dodgers Nation piece from last September!

“In only 75 at-bats this season, Ríos has 14 extra-base hits — 8 home runs, 6 doubles. At that rate, he is hitting a homer once every 10.6 at-bats, which is just ridiculous. To top it off, his average exit velocity of 92.6 MPH puts him in the top 15% of all hitters. In other words, if he puts a ball in play, you’ll hear it.”

That beautiful swing provides a tremendous amount of power. Rios will likely always be a high strikeout guy, but that’s okay. Rios brings the power. The Dodgers will be happy to have another power-hitting lefty back and add to the bench options for the 2022 season.

NEXT: Insider Suggests LA Could Offer Clayton Kershaw Incentive Laden Contract

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23 Comments

  1. It wears thin, this constant excuse of playing through an injury that supposedly has hampered your swing and reason for the horrible hitting. If you can’t swing the bat effectively, you shouldn’t be in the lineup, as you’re unjustifiably giving away 3-4 outs every game he starts. This includes Bellinger, who should have been sent down to AAA to either get healthy or fix his issues swinging the bat. The detriment that came from him playing was worse than having him in AAA for a couple of months. He provider so little offensively, his few defensive moments did little to erase the former.

  2. Having Rios injured and not able to play at full strength was a big loss. He hits a ton, plays 1st and 3rd and some left field. I agree shoulder injuries take awhile to get strong but I also read he had been dealing w shoulder pain since college, and he still made it to the bigs. I’d keep him, his ceiling is very high.

  3. I certainly think there is a place for Rios when healthy…it’s reasonable to project him as a bench player and I suspect his work in 2020 played into the decision to let Joc walk to a degree. I just wish players (and the club for that matter) would own up to injuries as soon as they are aware of them. Shoulder injuries are a bear; I sure hope we see a healthy Rios sooner rather than later next year.

  4. Rios – he never impressed me. I don’t know – it’s a long time before he’s recovered and swinging the bat well. Hope he comes all the way back, and we’ll see what we got come ST

  5. For anyone doubting Rios: rather than operating on your gut reaction (or ‘feelings’) go check out his 2020 stats – both regular season and postseason. Based on those statistics, he could have been considered as a viable replacement for Justin Turner if he had gone elsewhere. (Of course, fortunately, that wasn’t the case.)

  6. Bellinger changed his approach to hitting in the post-season. He did not all of a sudden get healthy. He choked up on the bat, widened his stance and stopped using a severe uppercut. He tried to hit the ball as it was pitched, not trying to hit everything into the stands, on every swing. He went from a .165 batting average and a very low OPS to a .353 batting average and .900 OPS in the 12 games in the post-season. If he follows the path he chose in the post-season, he could again be a very valuable player. He could be an all-star. It is up to him.